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  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    He stands at the steaming river’s edge
    With his soft arms in the air,
    And snares the sun among his tangled hair,
    And springs upon the wave’s thick ledge,
    And curls his arms around his hips,
    Brushing the hot foam with his lips.
  • Further information: This poem has a suggestion of the Egyptian myth, the Osiris-Isis story.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    Based upon themes from Mother Goose
    The lion fruit goes from my thumb
    And the branches stride from my hand,
    Proud and hard. Now I may watch
    The wings of the bird snap
    Under the air which raises flowers
    Over the walls of the brass town,
    Near the house of the grass stream,
    Looking down on the turrets.
  • Further information: This poem reminds the reader of a number of nursery rhymes including: Mary Mary, Quite Contrary and Tom, Tom, the Piper’s son, as well as the fairytale, Rupunzel.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt: Poem written on the Death of a Very Dear Illusion
    Grant me a period for recuperation,
    I have lost my nearest relation,
    Let there be tears,
    My love is crucified
    And split and bled,
    Bruised and ravished by commercial travellers.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    You shall not despair
    Because I have forsaken you
    Or cast your love aside;
    There is a greater love than mine
    Which can comfort you
    And touch you with softer hands.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    My vitality overwhelms you,
    My vigour is too heavy,
    My love is a strong burden,
    That weighs upon your shoulders.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt: And so the New Love Came
    And so the new love came at length
    Healing and giving strength,
    And made the pure love go.
    She echoed my laughter
    And placed my love upon her,
    Bearing the voluptuous burden,
    With pure love coming after.
  • Further information: Dylan mentions the the name Lilith in this poem, who according to myth, was the wife of Adam before Eve.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt: On Watching Goldfish
    You collect such strange shapes
    In the cool palm of your hand,
    You with long, sinewy limbs
    And muscles breaking through the skin.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    The lion, lapping the water,
    Moistening his gums
    And restoring his vitality,
    Is a balanced creature.
  • Further information: It appears that Lawrence’s animal poems may have influenced Dylan when writing this one.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt: I Am Aware
    I am aware of the rods
    Of the high sun coming down,
    Sharply, unwaveringly,
    With bright tips to pierce,
    Coming down pointed.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    My river, even though it lifts
    Ledges of waves high over your head,
    Cannot wear your edge away,
    Round it so smoothly,
    Or rub your bright stone.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    The corn blows from side to side lightly,
    Tenuous, yellow forest that it is,
    And bears the steady wind on its head,
    Brushing my two hands.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    We will be conscious of our sanctity
    That ripens as we develop
    Our rods and substantial centres,
    Our branches and holy leaves
    On the edge beyond your reach.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    I have come to catch your voice,
    Your constructed notes going out of the throat
    With dry, mechanical gestures,
    To catch the shaft.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    My love is deep night
    Caught from the tops of towers,
    A pomp of delicious light
    Snared under the tip of each stalk,
    Dew balanced to perfection
    On the grass delicate beyond water.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    When your furious motion is steadied,
    And your clamour is stopped,
    And when the bright wheel of your turning voice is stilled,
    Your step will remain to fall.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    No thought can trouble my wholesome pose,
    Nor make the stern shell of my spirit move.
    You do not hurt, nor can your hand
    Touch to remember and be sad.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    The hill of sea and sky is carried
    High on the sounding wave,
    To float, an island in its size,
    And stem the waters of the sun
    Which fall and fall.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    So I sink myself in the moment,
    I let the fiery stream run.
    How I vibrate, and the petunia too,
    As, garden to your loving bird,
    I’m all but cut by the scent’s arc.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    No, pigeon, I’m too wise;
    No sky for me that carries
    Its shining clouds for you;
    Sky has not loved me much,
    And if it did, who should I have
    To wing my shoulders and my feet?
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    The cavern shelters me from harm;
    I know no fear until the cavern goes;
    Without his dark walls I die,
    Without his winged roof
    I have no place to cover me.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt: Woman on Tapestry
    Her woven hands beckoned me,
    And her eyes pierced their intense love into me,
    And I drew closer to her
    Until I felt the rhythm of her body
    Like a living cloak over me.
  • Further information: Dylan’s childhood friend Daniel Jones has suggested that when writing this poem, with all its strange landscapes, he may have been thinking about a panel, weaved by Daniel’s mother, called The Garden of Eden that hung in their house.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    Pillar breaks, and mast is cleft
    Now that the temple’s trumpeter
    Has stopped (angel, you’re proud),
    And gallantly (water, you’re strong-
    You batter back my fleet),
    Boat cannot go.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    It’s light that makes the intervals
    Between the pyramids so large,
    And shows them fair against the dark,
    Light who compels
    The yellow bird to show his colour.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    Let me escape,
    Be free (wind for my tree and water for my flower),
    Live self for self,
    And drown the gods in me,
    Or crush their viper heads beneath my foot.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    O dear, angelic time – go on.
    I’ll try to imitate your going,
    And turn my wheel round, too,
    As sure and swift as yours.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    And the ghost rose up to interrogate:
    ‘When’d did you make the leopard yours,
    Who was an animal that could not follow
    The intricacies of another’s path?
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    When I allow myself to fly,
    There is no sense of being free;
    Only the other loosening me
    Can send the voluminous delight,
    And make the wind that hurries by
    Keener to invigorate.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    Admit the Sun
    Admit the sun into your high nest
    Where the eagle is a strong bird
    And where the light comes cautiously
    To find and then to strike.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt: A Section of a Poem called “Hassan’s Journey Into the World”
    We sailed across the Arabian sea,
    Restless to interrupt the season
    And for our castles and unshaken trees
    Take the bright minaret.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt: Claudetta, You and Me
    Her voice is a clear line of light
    Coming from the end of her world
    Into the uneasy centre of mine,
    And her hair is a forest whose trees
    I have planted, in thought,
    Time upon time.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    Come, black-tressed Claudetta, home
    To me, who, when you go,
    Fall into melancholy.
    You said “The shepherd by the brook,
    Singing to soothe his cares,
    Befriended me, and told me how
    The swallow was the bird he loved.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    Cool, oh no cool,
    Sharp, oh no sharp,
    The hillock of the thoughts you think
    With that half-moulded mind I said was yours,
    But cooler when I take it back,
    And sharper if I break asunder
    The icicle of each deliberate fancy.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    They brought you mandolins
    On which you might make song,
    And, plucking each string lightly,
    Send what you dreamt into the sky.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    The air you breathe encroaches
    The throat is mine I know the neck
    Wind is my enemy your hair shan’t stir
    Under his strong impulsive kiss
  • Further information: This poem is intentionally not punctuated.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    When all your tunes have caused
    The pianola’s roll to break,
    And, no longer young but careful,
    There are no words by which you might express
    The thoughts you seem to let go by
    You might consider me.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt: Written in a classroom
    Am I to understand
    You say what I should comprehend,
    And make the words I knew
    By sight and hearing
    Words to the whirling head?
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    Hand in hand Orpheus
    and Artemis go walking
    into the void of sense
    you stopped the eagle in its flight
    you took Endymion to your place
    now you go walking into sense
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    Oh! the children run towards the door,
    Opening a thousand times before they blink,
    And there are fifty Xmas trees
    Showing the snow on every thirtieth branch
    Outside the house, but not too far.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    Tether the first thought if you will,
    And take the second to yourself
    Close for companion, and dissect it, too,
    It stays for me
    With your no toil.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    One has found a delicate power.
    Quietly even and sound,
    Under the wings of a flower
    Raising its head from the ground,
    A measure of ease and delight
    In the sweet-footed dance of the night.
  • Further information: This poem was deleted from the notebook, however originally it was notebook 1, poem ‘9’.
  • When and where it was first published: Swansea Grammar School magazine, July 1930.
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    The shepherd blew upon his reed
    A strange fragility of notes,
    And all the birds and forests freed
    The music of their golden throats.
  • Further information: This poem was deleted from the notebook, however originally it was notebook 1, poem ’12’ and was printed in Swansea Grammar School magazine in July 1930 where its title was ‘Orpheus’.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    He said, ‘You seem lovely, Chloe,
    Your pretty body and your hair
    Are smoother than the rose and snowy,
    Soft as a plum and light as air.
  • Further information: This poem was deleted and was originally, as well as a few others, poem ’12’. Thomas wrote this poem in an visitor’s book at Yr Hendre farm, St Dogmaels, North Pembrokeshire in 1930 which is now at the National Library of Wales.
  • When and where it was first published: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989).
  • Where you can find it now: Dylan Thomas: The Notebook Poems 1930-1934, edited by Ralph Maud (1989). Currently out of print.
  • Excerpt:
    The rod can lift its twining head
    To maim or sting my arm,
    But if it stings my body dead
    I’ll know I’m out of harm.
  • Further information: This was a deleted poem which was originally notebook 1, poem ’30’.